Cummins to add SCR Aftertreatment to its On-Highway 2010 Heavy-Duty Engines - Engine Builder Magazine
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Cummins to add SCR Aftertreatment to its On-Highway 2010 Heavy-Duty Engines

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Cummins Inc. says it will add Selective Catalytic
Reduction (SCR) aftertreatment to its heavy-duty products for 2010 to
deliver improved fuel efficiency for its customers.
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Cummins will combine recent advancements in
catalyst technology with its unique engine systems to achieve the
significant fuel economy improvements, the company said. The new
catalyst technology, using copper zeolite, offers a greater conversion
rate of nitrogen-oxide (NOx) pollutants to nitrogen compared to earlier
technology. This results in significant advantages to optimize engine
aftertreatment for fuel economy and reduced operating costs, in
addition to meeting the near-zero emissions levels required by the
Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) 2010 regulations, according to
Steve Charlton, vice president, heavy-duty engineering.

As previously announced, Cummins heavy-duty ISX
engine family will incorporate the XPI fuel system, proven cooled
exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), the Cummins VGT turbocharger, Cummins
particulate filter and advanced electronic controls for optimized
performance, fuel economy and reliability. Cummins Emission Solutions,
a provider of SCR systems, will supply the integrated exhaust
aftertreatment systems for Cummins heavy-duty and MidRange engines.

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"Cummins expertise in engine system integration
means that we have the capability to make the engine systems and
aftertreatment technologies work together seamlessly," Charlton added.
"The addition of the new SCR catalyst technology ensures that Cummins
will deliver the best fuel economy in the industry and total operating
cost benefits to our customers." Up to 5 percent better fuel economy is
anticipated as a result of using the SCR technology. With fuel prices
up 70 percent in the past 18 months, better fuel economy for Cummins
customers was cited as the overriding reason to adopt the SCR solution
for its heavy-duty engines, according to company officials.

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"This move demonstrates Cummins ability to adapt to
a changing environment by leveraging technology advancements from our
MidRange engine development and Cummins Emission Solutions," said Ed
Pence, vice president and general manager, heavy-duty engine business.
"Our 2010 engine development is progressing on plan, and customers can
depend on Cummins to deliver these new products on time, with the
reliability, performance and fuel economy that they have come to expect
from us." Field tests on the new system have been underway since the
first quarter of this year, the company revealed. Since the 2010
on-highway engine is based largely on hardware already developed for
the 2007 engine, company officials expect the new SCR solution for
Cummins’ ISX to be ready in time for a January 2010 launch.

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Previously, Cummins had announced a dual strategy
to meet the 2010 EPA regulations, utilizing SCR for its medium-duty
engine offerings while using only enhanced EGR for its on-highway
products. The SCR process, the 2010 emissions strategy being adopted by
the majority of other heavy-duty engine manufacturers, requires the use
of diesel emission fluid (urea) injected into the exhaust in the
presence of a catalyst to reduce levels of NOx.

Visit Cummins Inc. at http://www.cummins.com or http://www.everytime.cummins.com.

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