Deciphering The Differences In The Chevy 2.2L Engine - Engine Builder Magazine

Deciphering The Differences In The Chevy 2.2L Engine

Since its birth in 1990, when the old Chevy 2.0L engine was upgraded
with a stroke increased from 3.15? to 3.46?, the 2.2L powerplant has
been upgraded several times: the block has been revised four times and
the head has been changed three times (it was discontinued after 2003, replaced by the 2.2 L Ecotec). Let’s start in 1994 and see if
we can’t clear up some of the confusion.

In 1994 the 2.2L Chevrolet became the base engine in the S-series
truck line, replacing the 2.5L Pontiac engines. This presents us with
the 2.2L now being both FWD and RWD, which you would think would mean
numerous differences. Actually, that’s not so. GM used two different
head gaskets through 1997, and in 1998 went to a common head gasket for
both FWD and RWD. Using the incorrect head gasket will result in almost
immediate overheating. The castings made changes in those years but
they followed suit in both FWD and RWD alike.

In 1994, the valve stem diameter went from 8 mm to 7 mm as well as
going to a roller lifter and assembled camshaft. The FWD requires the
use of a 34.4 mm soft plug in front of the head while the RWD is open
and must have the bolt holes drilled and tapped (see below). The 1994
motor could have casting number 10112391 or 10112391S that is the
service replacement. This same pattern was followed throughout the 1997
production cycle.

In 1998, head c/n 24575507 arrived with a heart-shaped combustion
chamber against a D shape. The engine also had smaller 1-1/8? diameter
exhaust ports vs. 1-3/8?, and a triangular top of the intake ports vs.
a smaller eyebrow top. This version of the GM 2.2L engine – a
single-year configuration – must have an open and drilled EGR port.

Since 1999 to present, cylinder head c/n 24576146 has been used and
is basically the same as c/n 24575507 except for crucial long flat
bosses that are now between the first two and last two exhaust ports
(see illustration below). The latest exhaust manifolds have a balance
channel that runs between ports 1-2 and ports 3-4 that must seal
against the cylinder head. As you can see, that exhaust manifold
configuration assembled against the 507 head would leak.

One last quirk, the 146 head may also be drilled for the EGR port as
a service replacement for the 507 head in 1998. All later applications
would require the use of an EGR block-off plate (GM p/n 24575919) when
used without EGR.

Well, there you have it, clear as a bell. No? Well perhaps the chart
included on page 30 of this issue will help! Good luck and remember it
is always easier to build it right the first time.

2.2L OHV L4 GM, CHEVROLET CYLINDER HEADS

OE PIN #

1994

12363166

1994-’97

12360424

1998

12563766

1999-2002

24577648

OE SUPER #

12360424

     

CASTING #

10112391

10112391S

24575507

24576146

7mm Valve Stem

X

X

X

X

8mm Valve Stem

*

     

Roller Rocker Arm

   

X

X

D Combustion Chamber

X

X

   

Heart Combustion Chamber

 

X

X

 

EGR Drilled w/Bolt Holes

Xc

Xc

Xc

Xc

EGR Not Drilles w/o Bolt Holes

Xc

Xc

Xc

 

Eyebrow Intake Port

Xa

Xa

   

Triangle Intake Port

   

Xa

Xa

Large 1.340? Exh. Ports

X

X

   

Small 1.120? Exh. Ports

   

X

X

Exhaust port balance boss

     

Xd

FWD water port closed with 34.3mm soft plug and no bolt holes

Xb

Xb

   

RWD Water open 34.3mm with 2 mounting bolt holes

 

Xb

   

FWD/RWD Water port open 1-21/64? with two mounting bolt holes

   

Xb

Xb

Lost foam casting

X

X

X

X

* prior to 1994 8mm valves were used

Notes:

  1. letter after X indicates illustration attachment
  2. Intake manifold EGR port on intake side in rear of head, the port
    goes around the back where EGR valve assembly connects, the channel
    than goes around on to exhaust ports down other side of head.
  3. #24576146 can be WOW drilled EGR port and bolt bosses, but is the
    only head that has exhaust manifold port balance boss between front two
    and rear two exhaust ports; this head w/EGR can be used as a
    replacement for 24575507
  4. 1998 is a stand alone MY application with heart shape chamber and roller rocker head with open EGR.

Special Note: 1998 applications all required an open
EGR port; 1999-2002 are closed EGR, w/exhaust manifold port balance
mounting face, (see Illustration D and observe area that arrows are
pointing to). #24576146 cylinder head may also have open EGR port and
will retro for 24575507 in 1998, or may be used 1999-2002 with the use
of EGR block off plate part # 24575919.

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