Shop Solutions Archives - Page 16 of 17 - Engine Builder Magazine
Engine Builder Shop Solutions: August 2009

Gasket Surface Cleaning Caution Cleaning gasket surfaces can be a terrible thing to do! Many of today’s cylinder heads, and various parts are made of aluminum. The use of cleaning discs can damage the surface being cleaned by actually removing some of the surface being cleaned.  There are also dangers of getting fibers from the

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: July 2009

The Modular Block ‘Main Event’ When performing main bearing housing bore work on an LS1, LS2, Ford 4.6L or other modular blocks the following procedures should be followed. First do all of your cap indexing, with cutting or aftermarket cap installation, then put the final torque on the mains. Next, install both cylinder heads and

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: June 2009

One More Head Gasket Tip In addition to the past two articles discussing head gasket failures, other head gasket failures can be caused by installation mistakes. Head bolts can stretch out. Many manufacturers recommend the head bolts be changed each time they are removed. Another common mistake is not cleaning the bolt and hole threads.

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: May 2009

Top 10 Machine Shop Business Tips Engine Pro recently held a series of 8 focus-group meetings in the Midwest. Each meeting consisted of 8 to 10 machine shop owners and a moderator. Three questions were asked during the meeting. “What’s working? What’s not working? What do you need most to help you ‘make it’ for

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: April 2009

Top 10 Machine Shop Business Tips Engine Pro recently held a series of 8 focus-group meetings in the Midwest. Each meeting consisted of 8 to 10 machine shop owners and a moderator. Three questions were asked during the meeting. “What’s working? What’s not working? What do you need most to help you ‘make it’ for

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: March 2009

Top 10 Machine Shop Business Tips Engine Pro recently held a series of 8 focus-group meetings in the Midwest. Each meeting consisted of 8 to 10 machine shop owners and a moderator. Three questions were asked during the meeting. “What’s working? What’s not working? What do you need most to help you ‘make it’ for

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: December 2008

Top 10 Machine Shop Business Tips Engine Pro recently held a series of 8 focus-group meetings in the Midwest. Each meeting consisted of 8 to 10 machine shop owners and a moderator. Three questions were asked during the meeting.  “What’s working? What’s not working? What do you need most to help you ‘make it’ for

Engine Builder Shop Solutions: October 2008

Top 10 Machine Shop Business Tips Engine Pro recently held a series of 8 focus-group meetings in the Midwest. Each meeting consisted of 8 to 10 machine shop owners and a moderator. Three questions were asked during the meeting.  What’s working? What’s not working? What do you need most to help you “make it” for

Shop Solutions: August 2008

Top 10 Machine Shop Business Tips We recently held a series of 8 focus meetings in the Midwest.  Each meeting consisted of 8 to 10 machine shop owners and a moderator.  Three questions were asked during the meeting: 1) What’s working? 2) What’s not working? and 3) What do you need most to help you

Shop Solutions: July 2008

Timing Chain Tensioner Installation Caution: 1996-’06 GM 2.4L This tensioner consists of a housing and a piston. The piston has a secondary piston or plunger contained in it and must be in the compressed position for installation. When compressed, the plunger extends approximately .070? (or 1.7mm) beyond the piston cylinder. If this is not the

Shop Solutions: June 2008

How To Handle Engine Diagnostic Nightmares Automotive machine shops are being asked more than ever to help diagnose engine related problems by a variety of customers. Repair shops, car dealers, parts suppliers and DIY’s are all in need of input from machine shop personnel.  Two problem areas we see today frequently involve auto manufacturers designs

Shop Solutions: May 2008

Installing Cam Bearings In Vintage Engines I have found that building vintage engines can be fun and also challenging, especially the very early engines where assembly information was somewhat limited.  Here is a suggestion that may be helpful when installing cam bearings in vintage engines:  Save the old cam bearings, especially if the engine will