Rotating Assemblies Archives - Engine Builder Magazine
PBM Rotating Assemblies

Hundreds of stroke and bore combinations are available, including custom assemblies.

Steve Morris’ SMX Rotating Assembly

Now that you’ve seen the ins and outs of the SMX block, Steve goes over his selections for the rotating assembly (crank, rods, pistons) for the engine.

Taking the Guesswork out of Rotating Assemblies

Rotating assemblies often turn into a guessing game as enthusiasts struggle to find the right option for their project. No matter who it is buying a rotating assembly, there are a few key factors to consider before making all your selections.

Crankshaft Balancing – Part 2

Watch to see the steps for a proper balance job.

Crankshaft Balancing – Part 1

In this episode of Steve Tech, Steve Morris breaks down what goes into a proper balancing job for a performance engine.

Rotating Assemblies in 2020

Are you still buying your crank, rods and pistons separately? Why not bundle and save?

Rotating Assemblies

Sourcing Rotating Assemblies for Stroker Applications Stroker engines are a popular choice for performance enthusiasts – whether the vehicle will run on the street, strip or a little of both, there’s something for everyone to love about a stroked engine. First of all, it sounds cool. Customers love telling their friends that they have something

More Power, More Problems – Balancing rotating assemblies in the modern day engine shop

Everyday life may be all about balance, but a quality balance machine and the understanding of how to do a quality balance job can tilt the scale in your shop’s favor.

Racing Rods – Engine Builders Have Options

Choosing a set of connecting rods is one of the critical steps in a performance engine build. The rods have to be strong enough to handle the anticipated speeds and loads, but also affordable for customers who have a limited budget. Most stock rods in late model engines can safely handle 400 to 500 horsepower.

Crank Grinding – The Myth of the .010”/.010” Crankshaft

Regrinding the crankshaft is an important part of the engine rebuilding process. It was almost an art in the ‘40s, but it’s pretty routine now. However, there are still plenty of myths and misunderstandings that are left over from the past that we still have to deal with today. One of the most common myths

High Performance Diesel Crankshafts, Connecting Rods & Pistons

Most stock Cummins, Duramax and Power Stroke engines can safely handle cranking up the turbo boost to produce 500 to 600 or more horsepower. But once you get to get up around 700 to 800 horsepower in an otherwise stock motor, things start to break and upgrades will be necessary.