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EPA Withdraws Proposed Regulation on Modified Racecars

SEMA President and CEO Chris Kersting released the following reaction to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) announcement that it would withdraw its proposed regulation on modified racecars.

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SEMA President and CEO Chris Kersting released the following reaction to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) announcement that it would withdraw its proposed regulation on modified racecars:

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“We want to thank Congress for pushing EPA to withdraw an ill-conceived proposal. However, confusion reigns: the agency continues to assert new-found authority under the Clean Air Act to regulate modification of vehicles for use in competition. This means that those converting and racing competition vehicles, and the parts and services industries that support them, do so under new EPA policy that considers the activity illegal. Only clarifying legislation, such as that offered under the RPM Act, will confirm that such activity is legal and beyond the reach of future EPA regulations. The racing industry and public need a long-term solution to eliminate any uncertainty regarding how the Clean Air Act is interpreted.”

While the EPA has announced that it will withdraw the proposed rule, the agency continues to assert newfound authority under the Clean Air Act to regulate street cars modified exclusively for the track. The future of the industry remains under a cloud of risk—the risk of future enforcement.

“The agency continues to assert a new interpretation of the Clean Air Act conveying authority to regulate vehicles modified for use in competition,” said SEMA President and CEO Chris Kersting. “This means that those converting and racing competition vehicles, and the parts and services industries that support them, do so under new EPA policy that considers the activity illegal. Only clarifying legislation, provided under the RPM Act, will confirm that such activity is legal and beyond the reach of future EPA regulations. The racing industry and public need a long-term solution to eliminate any uncertainty regarding how the Clean Air Act is interpreted.”

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The bipartisan Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports (RPM) Act makes clear that the Clean Air Act does not ban the modification of street vehicles for use in automotive competition. The bill addresses any doubts regarding regulation of racecars and equipment, and gives the public and racing industry much-needed certainty regarding how the Clean Air Act is applied.

The racing community and products makers can support the RPM Act by visiting www.sema.org/rpm.

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